Great Dixter Tickling Fork

€82,40
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  • Great Dixter Tickling Fork
  • Great Dixter Tickling Fork
  • Great Dixter Tickling Fork
  • Great Dixter Tickling Fork
  • Great Dixter Tickling Fork
  • Great Dixter Tickling Fork
  • Great Dixter Tickling Fork
  • Great Dixter Tickling Fork

The Great Dixter fork from Sneeboer was designed by Christopher Lloyd, the famous British gardening author who lived at an estate in East Sussex known as The Great Dixter. In a cottage garden where borders are packed with plants and self-sowers are essential, it is difficult to get into the tight spaces between plants to weed, and work the soil. This long handled fork enables you to do this without crouching or bending your back, allowing you to tip toe through the border and reach into difficult spaces. The narrow head and flat tines makes it possible to incorporate compost between plants minimizing damage and encouraging self-sowers (mulching would prevent this). Using a hoe smears the soil and simply doesn’t get deep enough. An essential tool for borders packed with plants. Fergus Garrett received the original tool from a fisherman in North Wales and after using it everyone fell in love with it. It was adapted by giving it a longer handle which enables you to use it without an aching back and its central tine was extended to give greater precision when dealing with individual weeds. The head is angled perfectly, to make it flow from your arms and feel a part of body. A narrow, light handle makes it easy to use and flat tines allow you greater contact with the soil.

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Product information

  • Article code 5050-328030
  • EAN 8715093050505
  • Width of head 13 cm
  • Length of head 25,5 cm
  • Length of handle 125 cm
  • Total length 144 cm
  • Number of spikes 3
  • Length of spikes 14,5 cm
  • Between spikes 4 cm
  • Material of handle Ash wood
  • Weight 1.1 kg
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